Recording Gleaston Castle

Cutting edge technology reveals secrets of Gleaston Castle

A grant from the Castle Studies Trust has allowed Morecambe Bay Partnership to help take forward understanding of the important Grade I listed site and Scheduled Ancient Monument of Gleaston Castle, nr Ulverston, Cumbria

The latest high-tech aerial technology has been used to capture photographic data of a local Furness castle ruin, helping local historians understand and record this important site for future generations.

In 2015, Morecambe Bay Partnership was awarded a grant by the Castle Studies Trust to obtain a permanent photographic record of the picturesque and unique, but sadly overlooked site of Gleaston Castle. Experts from local firm Greenlane Archaeology and Aerial Cam have gathered data, recording every aspect of the site including a detailed record of the architecture and construction of the castle.

An unmanned aerial vehicle – a quadracopter – was used, alongside more traditional archaeological recording techniques, to take thousands of digital images of the castle ruins, which will be transformed into a detailed 3D model of the site.

Surprisingly, and until now, there was no accurate record of the castle other than plans drawn up in the early 20th Century. This survey work is therefore creating a vital addition to the archaeological record for the region. It will not only serve as a permanent record of the site but will allow experts to inspect and analyse the castle, in particular the hard to reach towers.

The survey results will be available here shortly, with the 3D model and a report on the work available online, through both the Castle Studies Trust and Morecambe Bay Partnership’s websites.

Navigate the model below, produced by Aerial Cam, to explore the site further.

Gleaston Castle by aerial-cam on Sketchfab

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